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Posting some garden notes for 2020. (p.s. Regular doodles will be back soon. I needed a minute to think.) Leafcutter bees were visiting again. Last year they cut little circles out of the leaves from the Creeping Jenny groundcover. The bees use the leaf material in their nests. This year they are using leaves of the St. John's wort shrub that flowers in late June (around the time of Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day). I need to move this shrub because it grew since I planted it last year. I forgot that small plants usually fill out to be bigger than you imagined. It is spilling out onto the path right now and tied back with a string, which recently got caught on someone's bike and mangled the elaborate web of a support structure that was ready for a second crop of peas.
misha_pelt tipped:
0.48 USD
3 days ago
thecloudgallery tipped:
0.04 USD
3 days ago
marquee tipped:
0.02 USD
3 days ago
musiq tipped:
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3 days ago
unwriter tipped:
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3 days ago
bitscomplicated tipped:
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3 days ago
These are awesome!
I LOVE this type of artwork/sketch/notes. Davinci's sketches and notes are more visually appealing to me than his finished paintings. I love blueprints and architectural drawings too.
satoshidoodles tipped:
0.02 USD
3 days ago
satoshidoodles replied:
There are so many beautiful vintage plant illustrations, done during pre-internet times. People used the hours of the day to focus deeply on a subject with attention to detail.
This is so gorgeous, thank you! The leafcutter bees in my garden seem to adore Musk Mallow (Malva moschata) seedlings... such a hard decision though, but at the end the bees won, some of the seedlings were cut down to zero... haha
satoshidoodles tipped:
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3 days ago
satoshidoodles replied:
Thank you,@glauce! Luckily those mallow plants seem to reseed themselves relentlessly. ;-)
glauce replied:
You are so right, they are prolific lovelies... just like you!
Love these drawings 😊
satoshidoodles replied:
thank you,@musiq :)
Lovely SD. Thanks for showing these.
satoshidoodles replied:
thank you,@thecloudgallery for appreciating :)
We would be completely happy and delighted if we received a doodle about our charity campaign and placed it on the cover of our Twitter that we launched today. https://read.cash/@Hermansanchezg/along-with-bitcoin-cash-changing-the-life-of-90-people-f38cac80 https://read.cash/@Hermansanchezg/we-continue-donating-food-to-needy-people-on-the-street-thanks-to-bitcoin-cash-b32c083e β˜ΊπŸ‘
satoshidoodles replied:
Herman, would you please kindly email your request to (satoshidoodles at protonmail dot com) instead of spamming the thread? Thank you, and I'll consider it.
Un-illustrated garden notes: -after years of reading about beer traps for slugs, I've finally discovered that using grapefruit halves/rinds face down on the soil works well in a West/Wet Coast garden where it rains constantly (too much work and waste to refill with beer after every rain). The slugs crawl under the grapefruit rinds in the early morning and you can collect them to remove from the area with tender growing plants. -pill bugs, roly poly bugs, sow bugs... HOW DOES ONE GET RID OF THESE? I think they came from the worm compost bin. And fall leaves that were used as mulch. They ate all of the bush bean tips in one bed. They are everywhere. Boo.
misha_pelt replied:
Did you tried coffee? It helps too.
isaiah_smith tipped:
0.01 USD
3 days ago
satoshidoodles tipped:
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3 days ago
isaiah_smith replied:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biopesticide - Biopesticide use still allows companies to maintain organic classification for their organically grown plants(I think.). But I have seen great results when you accidently fluke it and create an environment where predatory insects and companion plants just happen to , somehow totally eliminate pests(the pests are still there but companion planting can attract the pests to a more favorable plant and allow management that way or many other combinations)) . There are pest susceptible varieties that farmers simply cannot grow economically without these screens, so you are not alone with this problem. Lady beetles are an example of a predatory insect that is the undisputed king in it's field for the eradication of certain pests on certain plants. There is a white colored material that farmers place on top of their gardens totally screening them from the outside environment accept for air and moisture and microscopic organisms that seep through the mesh mixed with water. https://www.amazon.com/Designing-Maintaining-Edible-Landscape-Naturally/dp/1856230260 The best book I have read on this topic. And your compost heap is a place where pests live. You can always start a separate compost heap for the plants you are trying to eradicate or minimize pests for. Just using trial and error until you create a different compost mix that will still no doubt contain pests but not the type of pests that are causing you problems for the specific plant you are focusing on. Also changing the location in your yard where you grow a specific plant can allow you more control over it's growing environment , your plant may be in a zone where the pests you are dealing with simply thrive. Also your mulch ,compost, liquid organic fertilizer solution, neighboring plants and soil or any space in your environment, even through the fence from next door can contain pests so by addressing these aspects individually ,it can allow you to prevent the pest you are dealing with easy access to the space you are trying to control. Also having a very healthy plant seems to be one of the best ways to combat pests. But I have conducted experiments where by slightly under-fertilizing organically when it comes to nitrogen that helped with reducing the how attractive the plant I was focusing on was to certain pests. I found the tendency people have for overfertilizing with nitrogen to create the lush green look was simply a magnet for pests. Also there are people who travel to other parts of the world to find wild examples of seeds of ancient varieties that can be used in developing the most hardy disease and pest resistant plants one can have not going down the genetically modified route. It is possible to contact organic farmers who have the variety you are trying to grow and seeds of an older, (wild) or a plant a farmer has worked on selecting for pest resistance for many years. Outdoor mini or large greenhouses or starting a raised garden bed with completely pest free medium and keeping it that way ,and simple enclosing the area with plastic, glass , that white screening material I was talking about or these wavy plastic sheets people use for pergolas can allow you to 100 % eradicate any pest. By having 100% control of the growing space, but then ventilation becomes an issue ,but it's totally doable but there's nothing like growing outdoors in nature. And you may not wish to have plastic sheets or mini greenhoused areas in your garden for esthetic or other reasons , that's why I outlined other alternatives . ( sorry for the lengthy reply this is one of my favorite topics)
satoshidoodles tipped:
0.24 USD
3 days ago
isaiah_smith replied:
Pyrethrum spray is a way to get rid of some pests in one hit quickly but the bio-pesticide (commercial organic farmers use it )and treatments like neem oil and a whole bunch of other teas and concoctions as I'm sure you are well aware of, offer longer term solutions. As well as physical repellant companion plants and companion plants that harbor beneficial predatory insects and birds that feed on the bugs you are trying to eradicate .
satoshidoodles replied:
@isaiah_smith thank you for your extended thoughts and suggestions. In my current little garden, there are identifiable separate zones, some pest-inhabited and some pest-free: 1 - a quickly constructed "pandemic" cinder block garden, two bricks high, about 4 feet by 4 feet, built on gravel. It's a part shade location. Layered from the bottom with: cardboard, thick pile of leaves (this was a mistake --> slugs), bagged soil (Seasoil, a brand I like). Peas, arugula, and radishes did really well here in the spring, despite slugs. Currently home to some Siberian kale. 2 - a section adjacent to the neighbours and fence, half potted plants. Blueberries, tomatoes in pots. Sunflowers, black-eyed susans, bush beans in the ground. Sunniest in the midday and afternoon. 3 - Lilac tree, hydrangeas, and a blank spot which is planned for transplanting bleeding hearts. 4 - Herb garden. Giant rosemary in giant pot plus parsley going to seed. Volunteer oregano, a clump of chives. Creeping jenny. Lupins are here. Also nasturtiums. 5 - Random little area where the tulips were in the spring. Peas, beans along the back at the moment. Borage and chives. For some reason, lots of pillbugs and also ants. :( 6 - Porch hanging baskets and balcony planter. The happiest shiso and basil is growing here, untouched by slugs. One hanging potted cherry tomato plant is here for midday sun. 7 - An ugly-looking "salad sled". The kids put a giant crack in their lime green-coloured plastic toboggan this past winter, so it was toast. We drilled some holes in the bottom, propped it on top of two milk crates, and stuck a long bag of soil on top. I cut the top off the bag of soil (poked some drainage holes) and planted it with salad greens. The first crop grew really well. Because, no slugs here! Inspired by this channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w2DJxMNppw 8 - Row of hostas on the shady side. My worm compost bins are kind of a lost cause. I'm thinking of harvesting all the worms, starting with fresh bedding (not fall leaves, but newspaper -- where does one find newspapers these days???) and dumping the pillbug-laden compost somewhere near the adjacent creek instead of letting the bugs loose in my garden. Hoping that raccoons like to eat the bugs?! I've previously used row cover but was too lazy this year. It does seem to be worth it for brassicas, because handpicking the cabbage worms (and the tiny yellow eggs) off the kale is a pain. Unfortunately, my children can no longer be enticed into doing this kind of job. No space suitable for a greenhouse, even one that's improvised. There's not enough hours of direct sun in any spot for it to be worth it. I'm not opposed to using plastic sheets, temporarily. (Previously I've sheltered tomatoes with a combo of rebar, bamboo, pvc piping, and clear shower curtains. Sorry, neighbours!) I will look into some of your tips. Thanks again for the input!
isaiah_smith replied:
Your more than welcome , one of my favorite topics . :) Jeez you seem like a keen gardener.
satoshidoodles replied:
@isaiah_smith it's definitely not a designer garden, but it's a little spot to putter, and enjoy the bees, hummingbirds, dragonflies...
One of my favourite annuals, nasturtiums. Their seed pods can be used to make a capers-like pickle. These are taking over a corner of the herb garden. The flowers are edible too.
glauce tipped:
0.04 USD
3 days ago
misha_pelt replied:
We love them :)
satoshidoodles replied:
<3 edible flowers
glauce replied:
Love them... coming out of the frame!
The right plants do well in the right conditions. These black eyed Susans are coming back nicely in a location that gets afternoon sun, although slugs were an issue in the spring. I planted three clumps last year and they're between a row of sunflowers (behind) and a row of bush beans (in front). I'm expecting that the mobs will be coming soon to rename these flowers (Rudbeckia hirta) which have a bit of a hideous common name (the black eyed part).
satoshidoodles replied:
You can leave the flowers without pruning (after the petals fall off) for visual interest during the winter and seeds for the birds.
Cherry tomatoes, pretty self explanatory. We had quite a cold and wet June and I didn't have the potted tomatoes sheltered from the rain, so a lot of the lower leaves looked unhappy. I hacked/pruned all of the lower branches off of the bottom foot of the vine or so. We'll see what happens.
musiq tipped:
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3 days ago
Arctic lupins, no longer flowering. I transplanted five clumps from my late mother's garden (back in March) where they were taking over the pathways. Even though these plants have long taproots (not recommended for transplanting), I managed to dig and yank them out, dunk them into a bucket of water for the five minute drive home, and relocate them into my current garden. Four of the five clumps survived the relocation. The young plants were severely challenged by slugs. They eventually flowered, although the stalks of purple flowers looked a bit wimpier than usual. I propagated a couple of extra plants by taking cuttings (tried that for the first time) and rooted them in pots to make new plants. Plastic bags propped over the pots helped for extra humidity during the first couple of weeks while the cuttings grew their roots.
Basil is starting to grow in the balcony box, from a random assortment of herb seeds shaped like blocks of chocolate, direct sown.
Red shiso is a Japanese herb that has a growth habit like basil. This year, I've used it as a basil substitute in salads and pasta dishes, since the very old basil seeds I tried to germinate did not happen this year.