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10 months ago
Monet was a master of the winter scene – he painted more than 100 of them. The Magpie depicts a solitary black bird perched on a gate formed in a wattle fence, in Etretat, as the light of the sun shines upon freshly fallen snow creating blue shadows. The painting features one of the first examples of Monet's use of colored shadows, which would later become associated with the Impressionist movement. Claude Monet > The Magpie, 1868–1869
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1 year ago
After his breakdown that resulted in the self-mutilation of his left ear, Van Gogh admitted himself to the Saint-Paul-de-Mausole lunatic asylum on 8 May 1889. He was allowed more freedoms than any of the other patients and was even given a studio. Inspired by the view from his window he painted Starry Night. He created twenty-one variations of this painting. Vincent wrote to Theo, "This morning I saw the countryside from my window a long time before sunrise with nothing but the morning star, wh
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1 year ago
Based on the poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson, this painting depicts an autumnal scene as if it were closing in around the condemned Lady of Shalott. Due to a curse, she is locked in a tower where she is only able to see the world through a mirror and recreate life through the weaving of a tapestry. One day she glimpses the reflected image of the knight Lancelot, and cannot resist looking at him directly. The mirror cracks from side to side, and she feels the curse come upon her. The punishment t
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1 year ago
The Great Wave was created around 1831 during the Edo period as part of a series of woodblock prints called Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku Sanju-roku Kei). The wave in the foreground and Mount Fuji in the background represent the unpredictability of life. Mount Fuji is the symbol of Japan that signifies stillness and eternity. As a sacred object of worship, holds a significant place in Japanese beliefs. This print started its life as a sketch, that was then carved into a block of wood
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1 year ago
Degas's favourite subjects were ballerinas at work, in rehearsal or at rest, and he tirelessly explored the theme with many variations in posture and gesture. It was the training and rehearsals that interested him. Here the class is coming to an end – the pupils are exhausted, they are stretching, twisting to scratch their backs, adjusting their hair or clothes, an earring, or a ribbon, paying little heed to the inflexible teacher, a portrait of Jules Perrot, a real-life ballet master. Edgar D
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1 year ago
Michelangelo was just 24 at the time of completion of the Pieta, which was soon regarded as one of the world’s great masterpieces of sculpture. It can be admired today in St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican. Michelangelo claimed that the block of Carrara marble he used to work on this was the most “perfect” block he ever used. At the time of its completion, some observers criticized Michelangelo for showing Mary too youthful to have a son who was 33 years old. Michelangelo defended himself by
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1 year ago
Spanish artist and motion designer A.L. Crego adds movement into still graffiti murals to create fantastic animations. In order to maintain the original artwork, Crego first photographed the sites and then digitally intervened to convert them into immersive animations. All the murals selected by the designer convey messages about dependence on technology and its effects on personal interactions. Check out more of his work here: https://giphy.com/alcrego A. L. Crego > Digital intervention ov
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1 year ago
The Medusa was commissioned to Caravaggio by his patron, Cardinal Francesco Maria Bourbon del Monte, who then gave it as a gift to the Grand Duke Ferdinando I de' Medici. It was painted on canvas applied to a convex wooden shield. Caravaggio displays huge technical achievements in this work by making it look concave and Medusa's head appear to project outward. The monster with the face of a woman and hair formed by snakes had the power to turn anyone who looked at her into stone. Perseus manage
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1 year ago
“Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision.” Salvador Dalí The Dalí Museum created an experience: go inside and beyond Dali’s painting Archaeological Reminiscence of Millet’s Angelus and explore the world of the Surrealist master like never before in this mesmerizing 360° video. Watch here:
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1 year ago
The scene is an outtake from Visite à Picasso (A Visit with Picasso), a 1950 film by Belgian filmmaker Paul Haesaerts. The full film can be watched here:
" Every act of creation is first an act of destruction. ” Pablo Picasso Do you agree?
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1 year ago
Jean-Michel Basquiat was a pop icon, cultural figure, graffiti artist, a poet, a musician, and neo-expressionist painter. He was a prodigy. In the early 1980s, Basquiat was befriended by many celebrities and artists, including Andy Warhol, with whom he made several collaborative works. At only 27, his troubles with fame and drug addiction led to his tragic death from a heroin overdose on August 12, 1988 in New York, NY. In 2017 an untitled Jean-Michel Basquiat work has sold for $110.5m to Japa
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1 year ago
Hieronymus Bosch > The Garden of Earthly Delights, 1490-1500
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1 year ago
Gustav Klimt > The Kiss (Der Kuss), 1907-1908
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1 year ago
Edward Hopper > Nighthawks, 1942
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1 year ago
Jacopo Tintoretto > San Marco libera uno schiavo, 1547-1548
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1 year ago
Vincent Van Gogh > Prisoners Exercising, 1890
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1 year ago
Canaletto > Veduta del Palazzo Ducale, 1750
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1 year ago
Joan Miró > Blue II, 1961
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1 year ago
Wassily Kandinsky > On White II, 1923
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1 year ago
Leonardo da Vinci > Self Portrait, 1510-5
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1 year ago
Henri Matisse > La Danse II, 1910
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1 year ago
Well hello there, proof of work pingers! Follow us if you like beauty in your feed. Sandro Botticelli > Primavera, 1470-80